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MUFASA

This is my personal blog where I reblog things that interest me.
I also upload some of My Art here.

Posts tagged clothes

Feb 21 '12
Jan 25 '12

flamboyantgentleman:

Series VII.  Royal blue dresses by Mary

Jan 25 '12
kimchitard:

omgthatdress:

Court ensemble ca. 1907 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Omigosh dapper to the MAX.

kimchitard:

omgthatdress:

Court ensemble ca. 1907 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Omigosh dapper to the MAX.

Jan 25 '12
Jan 25 '12
guyswear:


When you think of buying clothes from ebay, you probably think of old used clothing no one wants anymore. But it’s not!
Yes, ebay does sell used stuff and clothing is one of them. But they also sell new stuff, and most of the time it’s really cheap. I found some cool styles you won’t find at the mall.
For example, the item from the photo comes from Happy-Lighter Mens casual best outerwaer jacket & blazer collection
It’s on sale for today for $40 orig. $47 and the shipping is $20. I don’t know, i think $60 bucks seems like a good price.
Here’s some stuff to remember when shopping on ebay
Use the filters to find what you’re looking for faster and easier
Make sure it’s your size
Look at the shipping fee, some items may be cheap but an expensive shipping fee.
Buy from the BUY IT NOW section if you don’t want to bid
Read all the information about the item and the seller’s reputation

guyswear:

When you think of buying clothes from ebay, you probably think of old used clothing no one wants anymore. But it’s not!

Yes, ebay does sell used stuff and clothing is one of them. But they also sell new stuff, and most of the time it’s really cheap. I found some cool styles you won’t find at the mall.

For example, the item from the photo comes from Happy-Lighter Mens casual best outerwaer jacket & blazer collection

It’s on sale for today for $40 orig. $47 and the shipping is $20. I don’t know, i think $60 bucks seems like a good price.

Here’s some stuff to remember when shopping on ebay

  • Use the filters to find what you’re looking for faster and easier
  • Make sure it’s your size
  • Look at the shipping fee, some items may be cheap but an expensive shipping fee.
  • Buy from the BUY IT NOW section if you don’t want to bid
  • Read all the information about the item and the seller’s reputation
Dec 8 '11

paenis-mantis:

flippantgrin:

fyeaharttips:

mariealbertine:

This is Jack Hamm’s entire section on folds, minus a page that was repetitive so I ditched it to fit the photoset limit. If you guys like, I’ll scan more of his stuff from time to time, I have been trying to get everyone on board with him forever!

To reiterate, these scans are from Jack Hamm’s Drawing The Head And Figure.

Thank you so much mariealbertine for submitting this! :»!

holy shit this is the most useful thing ever

>see simple folds from body protrusions

>expect to see how pants folds work when a guy has a boner

>feelsbadman

Nov 15 '11

referencesforartists:

clothing folds 

Nov 1 '11
foervraengd:

elliotoille:

felt like doing a tutorial thingy (what should I call these??) again! I think I’ll make a tag for these in case I do more. This time I’m gonna talk a little about how angles affect how clothing falls aaaand stuff. here we go…
Given: The first drawing of these three is how the clothing naturally wants to fall, how it is made to be shaped. Or, whichever pose you could take that will give the garment the least amount of creases.
I’ll actually talk about the green first; this is a representation of the hip box, which itself is a representation/simplification of your whole pelvis area. You see how your legs and hip box oppose angles here. in almost all poses except standing straight, your hip box and legs will create a bent angle, which affects how clothes fall.
The red/blue is the skirt (obvs), the red specifically is the ellipses of the top and bottom openings of the skirt. This skirt is very stiff material for the sake of this example, so notice how the two ellipses always match eachother. the top ellipse is where the skirt is actually attached to the body, so it’s the boss; the bottom ellipse will more or less do exactly what the top one does.
here’s where the fact that the legs and hip box are at different angles becomes important. The top of the skirt is attached to the hip box, but the bottom ellipse is in the realm of the legs. The orange lampshade shape diagram there is a simplification of this. It is very much like if you were to tilt a lampshade. The side you are bending towards will hug the body and create creases. The side you are bending away from will fall off the body in a straight line.

It even works with pants, though as the bottom ellipse(s) gets farther away from the top there’s more room for the garment to get distorted by gravity, perspective, and bent knees and such. But with this last example you can really see how the side touching the legs really hugs the body underneath, whereas the other side hangs off of it in a straighter, crease-less line.
Dresses are a little different because their top ellipse is attached to your torso/ribcage mass rather than the hip box.

Much of the time you get the same result as with a skirt. However if the hip box and ribcage mass are opposed sideways rather than forward or backward, it becomes a little tougher:

You can see in the third drawing how a shirt and a skirt together would fall in opposite ways if your body is bent sideways. If the shirt is long, just like I mentioned above about the long pants, there is more distortion of this effect.
I’ll take what I said above, “The side you are bending away from will fall off the body in a straight line”, and add a bit to the end: “… until it hits something.” In the fourth drawing above, the garment is falling off the body in a straight line on the right side. If you lengthen the garment:

The straight side continues down as normal until it hits the leg and becomes the body-hugging side. in response to that, the body-hugging side from farther up becomes the straight side when it falls off the hip.
Aaand with that I think I’ll stop lol. I hope that wasn’t hard to understand. It’s easy to do yourself, just wear a skirt or some loose pajama pants and take hula poses in the mirror lol.

For all of you who have been longing for ME to make a tutorial about clothes, I truly recommend you to read this post. Since it covers the area in clothing that many other tutorials never mention, clothing is more than just “drawing folds and wrinkles”, it’s about knowing how the design and the behavior of our bodies affect it.
So yeah.
Read this. Please. It’s so easy explained.

foervraengd:

elliotoille:

felt like doing a tutorial thingy (what should I call these??) again! I think I’ll make a tag for these in case I do more. This time I’m gonna talk a little about how angles affect how clothing falls aaaand stuff. here we go…

Given: The first drawing of these three is how the clothing naturally wants to fall, how it is made to be shaped. Or, whichever pose you could take that will give the garment the least amount of creases.

  • I’ll actually talk about the green first; this is a representation of the hip box, which itself is a representation/simplification of your whole pelvis area. You see how your legs and hip box oppose angles here. in almost all poses except standing straight, your hip box and legs will create a bent angle, which affects how clothes fall.
  • The red/blue is the skirt (obvs), the red specifically is the ellipses of the top and bottom openings of the skirt. This skirt is very stiff material for the sake of this example, so notice how the two ellipses always match eachother. the top ellipse is where the skirt is actually attached to the body, so it’s the boss; the bottom ellipse will more or less do exactly what the top one does.
  • here’s where the fact that the legs and hip box are at different angles becomes important. The top of the skirt is attached to the hip box, but the bottom ellipse is in the realm of the legs. The orange lampshade shape diagram there is a simplification of this. It is very much like if you were to tilt a lampshade. The side you are bending towards will hug the body and create creases. The side you are bending away from will fall off the body in a straight line.

It even works with pants, though as the bottom ellipse(s) gets farther away from the top there’s more room for the garment to get distorted by gravity, perspective, and bent knees and such. But with this last example you can really see how the side touching the legs really hugs the body underneath, whereas the other side hangs off of it in a straighter, crease-less line.

Dresses are a little different because their top ellipse is attached to your torso/ribcage mass rather than the hip box.

Much of the time you get the same result as with a skirt. However if the hip box and ribcage mass are opposed sideways rather than forward or backward, it becomes a little tougher:

You can see in the third drawing how a shirt and a skirt together would fall in opposite ways if your body is bent sideways. If the shirt is long, just like I mentioned above about the long pants, there is more distortion of this effect.

I’ll take what I said above, “The side you are bending away from will fall off the body in a straight line”, and add a bit to the end: “… until it hits something.” In the fourth drawing above, the garment is falling off the body in a straight line on the right side. If you lengthen the garment:

The straight side continues down as normal until it hits the leg and becomes the body-hugging side. in response to that, the body-hugging side from farther up becomes the straight side when it falls off the hip.

Aaand with that I think I’ll stop lol. I hope that wasn’t hard to understand. It’s easy to do yourself, just wear a skirt or some loose pajama pants and take hula poses in the mirror lol.

For all of you who have been longing for ME to make a tutorial about clothes, I truly recommend you to read this post. Since it covers the area in clothing that many other tutorials never mention, clothing is more than just “drawing folds and wrinkles”, it’s about knowing how the design and the behavior of our bodies affect it.

So yeah.

Read this. Please. It’s so easy explained.

Sep 30 '11

lostsplendor:

Red Infanta Winter Coat by www.quiteland.com

Sep 24 '11

calantheandthenightingale:

Series I.  Dark green dresses by Mary Magdalene.